Is South Korea to Blame for the North's Nukes?

 
 

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South Korean TV Networks Shun Politically Active Actress

 
 

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Japan's Perspective on the Impact of Park Geun-hye's Win
(LinkAsia: December 21, 2012)
Yul Kwon:
After months of preparation and weeks of campaigning, South Korea has a new president. Park Geun-hye defeated her opponent Moon Jae-in on Wednesday to become South Korea's first female president. Here's a report from Japanese public broadcaster NHK on what Park's win means for South Korea.

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NHK World NEWSLINE
Airdate: December 20, 2012

Reporter:
Experts say the high voter turnout helped Park win more than 50 percent of the ballots. Some initially thought it would favor opposition candidate Moon Jae-in who has widespread support among young people. In past presidential elections, voters in their thirties or younger outnumbered those in their fifties or older. But this time around, the reverse happened. Perhaps because the society is aging, and birthrates are declining. The 50-plus set accounted for more than 40 percent of all voters. And they propelled Park into the top job. Park visited the national cemetery the day after her election win as all president- elects do. Then she outlined the plans.

Park Geun-hye:
My dream and hope is to make use of all the hidden potential of the South Korean people. We can create a Republic of Korea in which everyone will be guaranteed the rights to pursue happiness. I'll make it possible for all the people to share the fruits of our economic growth.

Voter:
I expect the new president to revive the economy and keep her promise to improve our lives.

Voter:
I hope the new government will do a lot to boost employment since it's been a tough time for young people. I want Park to keep her promises.

Reporter:
Some South Koreans want to be tough with the North. Others favor reconciliation. Park says it's her mission to ease tensions and maintain security. She refers to last week's launch, which North Korean officials said use the rocket to send a satellite into orbit, and other nations called a ballistic missile test.

Park Geun-hye:
North Korea's missile launch was a symbolic act that showed us how serious our security situation is. We will begin a new era for our country with a strong security system and a trusted foreign policy. I will keep my promise to the people.

Reporter:
Park spent part of this day exchanging views with ambassadors from Japan, the US, China, and Russia. She has already started moving to form her government. She'll meet with members of President Lee Myung-bak's outgoing administration to go over issues. A transfer commission will finalize her policies. Then in February she officially becomes the first woman in South Korea to be president. 
 
 

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South Korean Election: Dispatch from an Expat

 
 

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DPRK Rocket Launch Hangs Heavy over South Korean Election
(LinkAsia: December 14, 2012)
Yul Kwon:
So, perhaps the North Korean missile is more of a long-term threat than an imminent one. But, will it have a political effect? South Koreans go to the polls on December 19th to elect a new president. Japan's public broadcaster, NHK has this report on how the rocket might affect voters.

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NHK World NEWSLINE
Airdate: December 12, 2012

Reporter:
I'm standing at the unification observatory only two kilometers from the North Korean border. From here we have not detected any unusual activity on the other side that might be related to the missile launch. However, on this side, the presidential race is entering its final phase. The launch has definitely raised concerns about security. People in Seoul are expressing dismay and anger.

Seoul Resident:
A missile launch is totally unacceptable. We belong to the same race, but I never understand what they are trying to achieve through such an act.

Seoul Resident:
I was shocked they did this just before South Korea's presidential election. We need to beef up our national security.

Reporter:
South Korea's foreign minister Kim Song-hun condemned the North's decision to push forward with what it called a provocative act. He said the launch is a clear violation of UN Security Council resolutions. President Lee Myung-bak has maintained a hard-line policy against the North. During his five year term, Pyongyang has carried out three long-range missile launches and one nuclear experiment. There have been other military provocations. The North shelled Yongpyang Island and is said to have sunk a South Korean naval patrol ship in the Yellow Sea. And the presidential election next week, the two main contenders stressing the need to improve North-South relations, but people are taking a realistic view. Recent polls show many citizens feel that they don't support hard-line policies against the North. Nor do they believe in appeasement. The North missile launch is expected to influence voters' decisions.
 
 

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South Korean Elections: The Countdown Begins
(LinkAsia: November 30, 2012)
Yul Kwon:
South Koreans go to the polls in three weeks to elect a new president. The campaign officially got underway this week and two candidates are leading opinion polls. Here's how Japan's public broadcaster NHK reported the first day of electioneering.

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NHK World NEWSLINE
Airdate: November 22, 2012

Reporter:
Park Geun-hye of the ruling Saenuri party is one of the front runners. She visited a national cemetery in Seoul where she paid her respects to those who died in the Korean War and other conflicts. Park expressed her determination to become the country's first female president.

Park Geun-hye:
South Korea has to choose whether it wants to move forward with a prepared future or go back to the past, which is marked with failure. We are now standing at a crucial crossroads.

Reporter:
Park also said she will promise to build a nation where everyone can lead a happy life. She's locked in a tight race with Moon Jae-in of the opposition Democratic United Party. He spoke in the second largest city of Busan near his hometown.

Moon Jae-in:
I promise to become the first president to democratize the economy, and establish a strong welfare system through a new type of politics.

Reporter:
Moon also talked about entrepreneur turned politician Ahn Cheol-soo. Ahn dropped out of the race last week to give Moon a better chance of victory when voters head to the polls on December 19th. Moon said he'll never forget Ahn's sacrifice. He asked Ahn's supporters to back him.
 
 

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