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From Beijng to Tokyo, from Seoul to New Delhi, LinkAsia takes viewers into media about Asia – from Asia – offering unfiltered insight into one of the most diverse, fast-paced regions of the globe.

 

The LinkAsia blog features in-depth analysis from expert contributors and LinkAsia producers, as well as transcripts from NHK Japan reports.

 

LinkAsia airs Fridays at 9:30pm ET/6:30pm PT on Link TV, and is available online at LinkAsia.org.

LinkAsia News Brief

Rape Culture in India
 
 

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In Defense of the Chinese Tourist
 
 

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Survey Says: China and Japan Really Hate Each Other

Thuy Vu:
A troubling revelation: The Japanese government believes the stricken nuclear reactors at Fukushima are leaking 300 tons of radioactive water into the ocean every day. To give you some idea: That's way more than an average American family consumes every year. The government says the leak's been going on for most of the two and a half years since an earthquake and a tsunami smashed the reactors. The owner of the nuclear power plant, Tokyo Electric and Power Company, or TEPCO, says the 300 tons is only a guess. Guess or not, it adds to growing doubts about TEPCO's efforts to clean up. The Japanese government has become impatient. Here's Japan's public broadcaster, NHK.

 

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Reporter:
Prime Minister Abe gave details of his decision when government officials met about the nuclear disaster. Abe told the industry minister to instruct TEPCO managers to do whatever they can to stop the leaks right away. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga says the government is considering a plan to give TEPCO funding to contain the radioactive groundwater and protect the sea.

 

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Thuy Vu:
Relations between Japan and China have steadily declined over the past year, largely due to territorial disputes. Diplomacy has taken on a frosty tone. Researchers in both countries wanted to know how citizens feel. They say the recent survey reveals more than 90 percent of Japanese and Chinese have negative feelings toward each other. For more on that survey, here's NHK.

 

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Reporter:
Staff with the Tokyo-based non-profit think tank Genron NPO and the state-run newspaper, China Daily, have been conducting the poll annually since 2005. They asked more than 2,500 Japanese and Chinese what they think about their neighbor. They carried out the survey between May and July. Ninety percent of Japanese said they have negative feelings towards China. That's up six percentage points from last year. Ninety-three percent of Chinese said they had negative feeilngs towards Japan, an increase of 28 percentage points. The new poll suggests animosity between people in China and Japan worsened over the past year.

Japanese Citizen:
I don't have a positive image of China.

Japanese Citizen:
Chinese people push too much about their views on historical issues.

Chinese Citizen:
I especially hate Japan.

Chinese Citizen:
We don't need good relations with Japan.

Reporter:
The researchers asked Japanese and Chinese why they have bad impressions of each other. The tug of war over the East China Sea was the top reason. More than 53 percent of Japanese cited the territorial dispute compared with nearly 78 percent of Chinese. Wartime history is the second highest reason for this ill will. Nearly half of Japanese surveyed say they don't like Chinese criticizing them over the past. Sixty-four of Chinese feel Japan's apology for its invasion of their country isn't good enough. Some respondents consider armed conflict in the future a possibility. Nearly 24 percent of Japanese believe hostilities could break out compared to nearly 53 percent of Chinese. The leader of the Japanese NGO that conducted the joint survey said the results show relations have entered a critical phase. But he notes more than 70 percent of respondents on both sides consider the Japan-China relationship important.

Yasushi Kudo:
It's now a crucial time for both governments to start talks to resolve the deadlock. And the private sector should start taking action as well.

Reporter:
The researchers say their study suggests animosity is at its worst level since 2005. They say they want to see ways to overcome the bad feelings with dialogue. They are scheduled to hold a joint forum in Beijing this coming October. Tomoko Kamata, NHK World, Tokyo.

 
 

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Burma, Not Quite Out of Orwellian Danger
 
 

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Burma's Anti-Muslim Riots: A Buddhist Dilemma

 
 

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