A man in civilian clothes looks at another man wearing an army uniform and resting a rifle in his arm. | "When Lambs Become Lions"

Link Voices

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Foreign Correspondent

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A man looks out to a vast landscape of mountains and water. | From "Embrace of the Serpent" / Kino Lorber

Cinemondo

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Earth Focus

Earth Focus

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Rahaf Al Qunun | "Four Corners" episode "Escape from Saudi"

Four Corners

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America ReFramed

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Tending Nature

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Paige Laduzinsky

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Paige Laduzinsky is a curator, exhibit content developer, and media producer. She is the former Director of the Global Museum at San Francisco State University, where she also taught graduate courses in Museum Studies and recently worked with graduate students to curate an exhibition on the impacts of climate change on indigenous communities. She was formally an Associate Curator at the Autry Museum of the American West and lead curator of the California Continued exhibit. She has also held positions at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the California Academy of Sciences. She has served as consulting producer and co-producer for multiple KCET projects, including "Tending Nature," "Tending the Wild," and "The Art of Basketry" episode on "Artbound."

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Seneca white corn grown at the Cultural Conservancy. | Still from "Tending Nature" episode “Cultivating Native Foodways with the Cultural Conservancy."
Article
Tending Nature

A Return to Heirloom Corn Unpacks Powerful Cultural Histories

A growing number of seed programs is atempting to connect Indigenous communities back to traditional ecological knowledge, while encouraging healthy diets and sustainable farming practices for all.
Sara Moncada (Yaqui/Irish), chief program officer at the Cultural Conservancy, left, and Melissa K. Nelson (Turtle Mountain Chippewa), president and CEO of the Cultural Conservancy, right, tending plants together. | Still from "Tending Nature"
Article
Tending Nature

Reclaiming, Restoring and Preserving Indigenous Relationships

The third and final season of “Tending Nature” emphasizes a reciprocal relationship between human and land, acknowledging Indigenous presence, and respecting natural resources.
Prescribed burn in the Shasta-Trinity Forest. |  Pacific Southwest Forest Service, USDA / Flickr / CC BY 2.0
Article
Tending Nature

Five Reasons Why Native Knowledge is Essential to Understand the Environment

An environmental studies expert explores why the Indigenous perspective has not traditionally been recognized but it is crucial to integrate it into policy planning and resource management.
Indigenous people, fishermen, and climate activists protest during an oil and gas auction in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2017. | Juliana Colussi / Creative Commons
Article
Tending Nature

The Disproportionate Impact of Climate Change on Indigenous Communities

Indigenous people are on the front line of climate change but despite the many challenges they face, many communities around the world are adapting using their traditional knowledge.
Ti'at Society launches Moomat Ahiko into the water
Article
Tending Nature

Traditional Boat Building Helps Native Community Hone Ecological Knowledge

Traditional watercraft are symbols of cultural identity and heritage that promote healing from the traumatic legacies of colonialism, while also serving as powerful messengers for climate action and social justice.
tending nature makam hamohlone
Article
Tending Nature

Why Integrating Indigenous Voices is Key in Tackling Ecological Problems

Across the world, Indigenous peoples have lived in their ancestral homelands for thousands of years. To have their perspective and their traditional knowledge is key when confronting contemporary environmental challenges.
Linda Yamane (Rumsien Ohlone) weaves a coiled basket | Matthew Whalen
Article
Artbound

Basketry: An Art that Lives Across Generations

Baskets in Native California culture is an artistic tradition that has been practiced for thousands of years. It’s one that has endured hardship, loss, adaptation and resilience throughout history.
Acorn woodpecker at granary
Article
Tending the Wild

Weaving With Feathers in the 'Silent Spring' Era

Native artisans face the challenge of protecting threatened bird species while preserving their cultural traditions.
Mabel McKay
Article
Tending the Wild

Mabel McKay: She Wove. She Taught. She Healed. She Changed The World.

Traditional Environmental Knowledge includes education and activism. Mabel McKay embodied both.
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Article
Tending the Wild

Tules: Weaving Baskets, Boats, Decoys, and Houses

One of California's most common freshwater wetland plants was — and is — one of its most useful resources.
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