A man in civilian clothes looks at another man wearing an army uniform and resting a rifle in his arm. | "When Lambs Become Lions"

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Foreign Correspondent

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Cinemondo

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Earth Focus

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Rahaf Al Qunun | "Four Corners" episode "Escape from Saudi"
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Four Corners

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America ReFramed

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Tending Nature

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Sonia Paul

Sonia Paul

Sonia Paul is an independent journalist and radio producer, and a contributing editor at MediaShift.org, covering the intersection of journalism, advertising, and technology. Previously, she worked as an associate editor for LinkTV’s World News website, and helped launch the social media channels for Link TV's LinkAsia news program.

Sonia reported ahead of Uganda’s 2016 presidential elections as a fellow with the International Women’s Media Foundation, covered India’s 2014 national elections for leading international and Indian outlets, and founded and produced a podcast series in Japan when she taught English in the country from 2009 to 2011. Her work focuses on culture, corruption, identity politics, and media, and has been featured on the New York Times, BBC World Service, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, VICE News, and Public Radio International, among other outlets.

She was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, and graduated with honors from UCLA and Columbia Journalism School. She’s on Twitter @sonipaul.
 

Sonia Paul
Citizens of other countries, as well as Americans abroad, are understanding the U.S. elections with lenses colored by foreign policy, personality, and the politics of their current environments.