Centenarians

Americas Now

Honduras - Child Marriage Ban - According to The World Bank, 15 million girls marry before the age of 18 globally. It's a phenomenon that's common in many poor nations around the world. One of the countries with the highest rates of underage marriage has been Honduras. But in 2017 lawmakers passed a landmark ruling which raised the marital age from 16 to 18. The new law is a big adjustment for Honduras where marrying very young has always been part of the culture. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck takes a look at how difficult banning a practice can be when it's so steeped in tradition. A conversation with President of Panama Juan Carlos Varela - In June of 2017 Panama and China made history by establishing diplomatic relations. Fast forward a year and a lot has happened. President Varela made an official state visit to Beijing to sign a series of agreements. During this time, the two nations implemented more than 20 deals and a free trade agreement is also a part of the political sphere. "Americas Now" anchor Elaine Reyes had the opportunity to sit down with President Varela. They discussed Panama-China relations and Latin America's current political and economic situation. Urban Voices - Argentina Artisan Knife Maker (Joel Richards) - Damascus steel is made by an ancient technique of welding patterns onto swords and knives. It is a craft -- only a handful of artisans still use. One of them is a man from Argentina. He works alone in his workshop on the outskirts of Buenos Aires and sells his creations around the world. Our "Urban Voice" is knife master and bladesmith ... Guillermo Mendoza. Musical - Magic Tree - South America is home to a highly-coveted tree that used to be plentiful -- but almost became extinct from deforestation. It's being nurtured back to life on Colombia's Caribbean coast. Nicknamed "The Magic Tree"...its nutritious fruit has many uses. And its sap possesses medicinal qualities. We leave you with these images of the Guaimaro tree.

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Americas Now

Lifeline for Haiti - In recent years -- money sent by Latinos abroad.. .to their families back home -- has grown. In fact...from 20-16 to 20-17...they sent a total of 75-billion dollars...a new record, according to the World Bank. The money...called, remittances reflect the rise of migration across the continent..."two-thirds" of migrants from Latin America -- live in the United States. One of the countries that receives the most -- is Haiti, where the money accounts for almost 35-percent of the GDP.

  • 2019-08-23T05:00:00-07:00
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Colombia - Microfinances (Michelle Begue) - According to Colombia's National Statistics Department, 12.4 million people were living below the poverty line in Colombia in 2017. That translates into living on less than 88 dollars a month. For many of those residents dreams of having their own business seem impossible. But some industrious women, with some innovative ideas, have found support in the form of a financial service. And it's helping produce a long-term change in their lives. Correspondent Michelle Begue has the story from Bogota.

  • 2019-08-23T18:00:00-07:00
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Mexico - Tech-Mex - Part of U.S. President Donald Trumps' "get-tough" policy is expected to include an increase in the expulsion of undocumented citizens to their home countries. Mexico is one of the nations that might face the largest number of returnees. For many of them it could feel like starting over as they know little about the language and culture of their country of origin. That makes things like finding a job difficult. But the digital startup sector in Mexico is viewing the return of migrants from the U.S. as an opportunity.

  • 2019-08-30T05:00:00-07:00
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Ecuador - Venezuela Exodus (Harris Whitbeck) - South America is experiencing its largest mass migration in recent history. Tens of thousands of Venezuelans are fleeing the economic hardship and political instability in their country...arriving at the borders of neighboring countries each day. Peru, Colombia, Argentina and Brazil are all coping with intense pressure from the influx. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck reports from Ecuador, another country feeling the strain of the crisis -- and one that's already seen its share of mass migrations.

  • 2019-08-30T18:00:00-07:00
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Guatemala - Girls at Risk (Harris Whitbeck) - It was an event that shocked the entire country and made headlines around the world. 42 girls, locked up in a state home for children in Guatemala --burned to death. The fire broke out following protests and accusations of poor conditions and abuse. The incident also revealed many of the vulnerabilities faced by young people. More than a year after the tragedy the victim's relatives are still looking for answers. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck tells us more about Guatemala's girls at risk.

  • 2019-09-06T05:00:00-07:00
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Brazil - Children of Zika (Lucrecia Franco) - Between 2015 and 2017 some 3000 babies in Brazil were born with a rare condition. Their heads were much smaller than normal and their brains weren't fully developed. Doctors diagnosed those babies with "Microcephaly," a disorder caused by a variety of genetic and environmental factors. And these cases were linked to Zika. Correspondent Lucrecia Franco visited the city of Recife, one of the country's most affected areas in the world for what is now called "Congenital Zika Syndrome", and brought us the story of the Zika Children.

  • 2019-09-06T18:00:00-07:00
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Guatemala - Unearthing Answers - Guatemala is one of the Central American countries that suffered the most during the Cold War - a time of post-World War Two tensions between the Soviet Union and the United States. In particular a civil conflict in Guatemala from 1960 to 1996 that left hundreds of thousands dead -- and tens of thousands missing. More than two decades after the end of the conflict, forensic anthropologists are helping families who have been searching for their disappeared loved ones. Harris Whitbeck explains from Guatemala City.

  • 2019-09-13T05:00:00-07:00
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Lifeline for Haiti - In recent years -- money sent by Latinos abroad.. .to their families back home -- has grown. In fact...from 20-16 to 20-17...they sent a total of 75-billion dollars...a new record, according to the World Bank. The money...called, remittances reflects the rise of migration across the continent..."two-thirds" of migrants from Latin America -- live in the United States. One of the countries that receives the most -- is Haiti, where the money accounts for almost 35-percent of the GDP.

  • 2019-09-13T18:00:00-07:00
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Brazil - Black Pride (Stephen Gibbs) - Brazil is sometimes portrayed as one of the world's harmonious, multi-ethnic "rainbow nations." But the truth is more complicated. For generations, white Brazilians have enjoyed preferential treatment over their black counterparts. It's been especially noticeable in higher education. Most publicly-funded universities are filled by white students, even though half of all Brazilians are of African descent. To reverse that trend, the government has adopted a quota policy.

  • 2019-09-20T05:00:00-07:00
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Mexico - Tech-Mex (Harris Whitbeck) - Part of U.S. President Donald Trumps' "get-tough" policy is expected to include an increase in the expulsion of undocumented citizens to their home countries. Mexico is one of the nations that might face the largest number of returnees. For many of them it could feel like starting over as they know little about the language and culture of their country of origin. That makes things like finding a job difficult. But the digital startup sector in Mexico is viewing the return of migrants from the U.S. as an opportunity.

  • 2019-09-20T18:00:00-07:00
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