Centenarians

Americas Now

Ecuador- Electronic Currency (Harris Whitbeck) - Ecuador is the first Latin American country to enter the digital currency world, rolling out its version of the electronic money in 2015. But its implementation hasn't been easy. Not many consumers are convinced of its benefits. Private bankers and members of the business community claim it doesn't work and are afraid it will be an excuse for the government to change the current legal tender -the dollar- for a "national" currency. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck reports from Quito. Game Changer - Orinoco Alligators (Michelle Begue) - For centuries poaching has led to the extinction and endangerment of some of the world's most beautiful animals. In Colombia and Venezuela, the reptile known as the Orinoco Caiman fell to that fate. One man is working to protect the few that remain and help them re-populate their natural habitat. Meet this week's Game Changer: Rafael Antello. Musical - Volcano boarding Nicaragua - Finally, for our musical-end piece today, we head to the Cerro Negro volcano in Nicaragua, where volcano-boarding has become a special attraction for tourists. After hiking to the top and enjoying the gorgeous view adventure seekers then board all the way down to the bottom, at speeds up to 80 kilometers per hour.

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Mexican Raperas & Latina Scientist

Mexico - Raperas (Gerry Hadden) Murders of women have become so commonplace in Mexico in recent years, the term "femicide" is now firmly embedded in the country's vocabulary. And in most cases families claim authorities don't properly investigate. But women fighting for justice, security and equal rights in Mexico have a new and vocal ally in their cause: female rappers. The budding movement isn't drawing huge crowds but its message is resonating, especially among the younger generation. Correspondent Gerry Hadden reports on the Raperas of Mexico City.

Guatemala - Trademark Battle/Cuba - Farming Future

Guatemala - Trademark Battle Guatemala is recognized throughout the world for the quality of its intricately handwoven textiles. Mayan women have used them to make blouses known as huipiles that, over hundreds of years, have come to represent an important part of their cultural identity. The weaves have also become popular among contemporary designers who use them to create fashion accessories. But some Mayan women aren't happy about that. Saying their designs are being stolen, they have started a legal battle to trademark their products.

Colombia - Farc's Return to Civil Life/Panama - Drones Protect Territory

Colombia - FARC's return to civil life As fifty years of fighting end in Colombia, FARC rebels are trying to resume a normal life. But while they may be laying down their arms, many are not giving up the fight. Many FARC members claim that while they will surrender their weapons, they won't change their ideology. And transitioning back into society could take years. Panama - Drones protect territory A tribe in Panama with strong roots in the rainforest is seeking a land title to secure their territory. And they're protecting their borders with a surprising form of surveillance. Drones.

Centenarians and Recycling

Costa Rica - Centenarians (Harris Whitbeck) - The number of people who live to be 100 years or more is growing. It's estimated that there are more than 450,000 centenarians living across the globe and that segment of the population is the fastest growing one of all. Experts say there are many factors that contribute to the existence of centenarians and recently they have started identifying key traits that are common to them all. Those traits have also been found in five distinct areas around the globe, and two of them are in the Americas.

Peru - Counterfeit Money

Peru - Counterfeit Money (Dan Collyns) - The Peruvian capital of Lima is the "fake dollar" capital of the world, according to the United States Secret Service. For the past four years, the U.S. government has declared Peru the world's leading producer of fake US currency. That's a fact drawing a lot of attention to the clandestine world of Peru's counterfeiters as Correspondent Dan Collyns reports.