Centenarians

Brazil - Syrian Refugees

Brazil - Syrian Refugees (Gerry Hadden) - As European countries squabble over how many refugees from the Syrian war to take in, an unlikely and far-away country has already opened its doors: Brazil. "The Giant of the South" has taken in over 2000 Syrians, and has plans for 20,000 more this year. The country is fast-tracking their visas, making it an easy and safe destination. However, many Syrian refugees know very little of Brazil.

 

Mexico - Game Changer Bico Yubo (Lisa Hagen) - Violence has forced "many" in parts of Mexico—to limit their time outdoors and stay at home. In the southern city of Juchitan, motorcycle taxis are the main means of transportation. They're also used as a tool in committing crimes, including assaults and robberies. But a group of young, indigenous artists is using the vehicle to carry culture to remote communities. A taxi filled with library books, movies and music for people who don't have access to those resources is the first of its kind in Latin America. Meet this week's Game Changer Rodrigo Vasquez.

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Americas Now

Brazil - Children of Zika (Lucrecia Franco) - Between 2015 and 2017 some 3000 babies in Brazil were born with a rare condition. Their heads were much smaller than normal and their brains weren't fully developed. Doctors diagnosed those babies with "Microcephaly," a disorder caused by a variety of genetic and environmental factors. And these cases were linked to Zika. Correspondent Lucrecia Franco visited the city of Recife, one of the country's most affected areas in the world for what is now called "Congenital Zika Syndrome", and brought us the story of the Zika Children.

  • 2020-02-21T04:00:00-08:00
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Americas Now

Colombia - Fragile X Syndrome (Michelle Begue) - For decades a small rural town in Colombia developed a reputation for having offbeat citizens who exhibited strange behavior. They became the focus of a scientific study that revealed they were actually victims of a gene mutation. It's called Fragile X. And it's a leading cause of physical, social and intellectual abnormalities. Correspondent Michelle Begue travelled to the town of Ricaurte to bring us this report.

  • 2020-02-21T17:00:00-08:00
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Americas Now

Lifeline for Haiti - In recent years -- money sent by Latinos abroad.. .to their families back home -- has grown. In fact...from 20-16 to 20-17...they sent a total of 75-billion dollars...a new record, according to the World Bank. The money...called, remittances reflects the rise of migration across the continent..."two-thirds" of migrants from Latin America -- live in the United States. One of the countries that receives the most -- is Haiti, where the money accounts for almost 35-percent of the GDP.

  • 2020-02-28T04:00:00-08:00
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Americas Now

Peru - Amazon Reforestation (Dan Collyns) - Peru's Amazon most bio-diverse ecosystem is in the Madre de Dios region. It's also one of the most under threat from deforestation. The primary culprits are illegal logging, gold mining and livestock farming. The past decade has been especially devastating for the region. Correspondent Dan Collyns visited the area to survey the damage. He also spoke to some scientists who are finding innovative ways to fight back. Mexico - Firework Town (Alasdair Baverstock) - Fireworks have been dazzling spectators at celebrations across the world for centuries.

  • 2020-02-28T17:00:00-08:00
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Americas Now

Argentina - Argentine Peso Crisis (Harris Whitbeck) - A year ago the future looked bright for Argentina. President Mauricio Macri had helped the country dodge a recession and the stock market was booming. But this year, as deep reforms were being implemented into the economy, fiscal disaster struck. And the nation has plunged into an economic crisis. At the center of this financial storm is the beleaguered Argentine peso, and its relationship to the US dollar.

  • 2020-03-06T17:00:00-08:00
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Americas Now

Mexico - The other Migration (Mike Kirsch) - In the last 30 years more than a million Mexican scientists, researchers and intellectuals have left Mexico to find work in other countries. That's according to the Mexican government. The exodus has been referred to as an epic "brain drain." Another 160 thousand college graduate students have also left the country with very few of them planning to return. The government is now trying to lure them back. Correspondent Mike Kirsch reports.

  • 2020-03-13T18:00:00-07:00
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