Centenarians

Colombia's Homeless City & Portuguese Homecoming

Colombia - Homeless City

When Bogota's new mayor Enrique Penalosa took office in early 2016, he vowed to take down crime in the Colombian capital. One of his first offensives was a raid into the "Bronx." It is the city's most dangerous slum, plagued by drugs, weapons and savage violence. The raid ended with the evacuation of cartels and criminal gangs but it also uncovered a complex reality: thousands of people were living in the Bronx, without a home. Correspondent Michelle Begue has more on Colombia's Homeless City.

Portugal - Portuguese Homecoming

Waves of Brazilians have been arriving in Portugal, in what some are calling an unprecedented influx of immigration. They come from all walks of life: rich and poor; educated and uneducated; entering with and without legal documents. But they are bound by a common goal: to escape economic and political instability back home. "Americas Now" correspondent Gerry Hadden has the story of this unique return to the motherland.

Musical Rio: World Heritage Rio

It's called the Marvelous City an iconic metropolis known for its sky-high cliffs, vast beaches and lush tropical vegetation. Its most emblematic statue is said to welcome visitors with open arms: Its most famous song celebrates a girl who swayed her hips on the way to Ipanema beach. And now, it's officially a UNESCO World Heritage Site after almost 5 years waiting. Rio de Janeiro is this week's musical ending piece.

Upcoming Airdates

Americas Now

Immigrant Caravan - Migration remains one of President Donald Trump's political pressure points, as he promises to crack down on illegal immigration like never before. But with buzzwords like 'catch-and-release' flying around, it's difficult to sort facts from political fiction. Correspondent Alasdair Baverstock looks deeper into the issue. Students Crossing - The best way to assess the impact of U.S. immigration policy on children of deported parents is to spend the day with them. That's according to child welfare authorities.

Americas Now

Lifeline for Haiti - In recent years -- money sent by Latinos abroad.. .to their families back home -- has grown. In fact...from 20-16 to 20-17...they sent a total of 75-billion dollars...a new record, according to the World Bank. The money...called, remittances reflect the rise of migration across the continent..."two-thirds" of migrants from Latin America -- live in the United States. One of the countries that receives the most -- is Haiti, where the money accounts for almost 35-percent of the GDP.

Americas Now

Mexico - Tech-Mex - Part of U.S. President Donald Trumps' "get-tough" policy is expected to include an increase in the expulsion of undocumented citizens to their home countries. Mexico is one of the nations that might face the largest number of returnees. For many of them it could feel like starting over as they know little about the language and culture of their country of origin. That makes things like finding a job difficult. But the digital startup sector in Mexico is viewing the return of migrants from the U.S. as an opportunity.

Americas Now

Guatemala - Girls at Risk (Harris Whitbeck) - It was an event that shocked the entire country and made headlines around the world. 42 girls, locked up in a state home for children in Guatemala --burned to death. The fire broke out following protests and accusations of poor conditions and abuse. The incident also revealed many of the vulnerabilities faced by young people. More than a year after the tragedy the victim's relatives are still looking for answers. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck tells us more about Guatemala's girls at risk.

Americas Now

Guatemala - Unearthing Answers - Guatemala is one of the Central American countries that suffered the most during the Cold War - a time of post-World War Two tensions between the Soviet Union and the United States. In particular a civil conflict in Guatemala from 1960 to 1996 that left hundreds of thousands dead -- and tens of thousands missing. More than two decades after the end of the conflict, forensic anthropologists are helping families who have been searching for their disappeared loved ones. Harris Whitbeck explains from Guatemala City.