Centenarians

Mexican Female Rappers & Argentinean Gabriela Gonzalez

Mexico - Rappers

Women fighting for justice, security and equal rights in Mexico have a new and vocal ally in their cause: female rappers. The budding movement isn't drawing huge crowds yet but its message is resonating. Especially among the young. That's in part because thousands of young women go missing every year in Mexico. And in most cases authorities don't investigate. Our correspondent Gerry Hadden reports from Mexico City. Watch the segment above.

Women in Science - Argentinean Gabriela Gonzalez

When she was growing up in Cordoba, Argentina, Gabriela Gonzalez wanted to be a math teacher. By the time she got to college, she had fallen in love with physics. Now, this professor at Louisiana State University is the spokesperson for a team that has made history for the discovery of gravitational waves, which Einstein predicted 100 years ago. There is little question the team will win the Noble Prize.

Game Changer - Peru - Maria Costa Checa

When it comes to women in science and technology, the challenge is to provide opportunities and access. Even more so in Latin America where women are under-represented in this field. In Peru social entrepreneur Mariana Costa is trying to do just that. She's the founder of the founder of Laboratoria, a social enterprise that empowers young women by giving them access to education and work in the digital sector.

Spain - Domincan Culinary Star

A 27-year-old woman from the Dominican Republic moved to Madrid looking for a career as a chef. But because she had no formal training, the only job she could get was washing dishes. Now, less than ten years later, she is an award-winning chef... and her career is doing all the sparkling. This is the story of Maria Marte, the "Michelin Cinderella" whose hard work is the true protagonist of this fairy tale.

Upcoming Airdates

Privatizing Education in Haiti & Latinos in Silicon Valley

Haiti - Privatizing Education (Stephen Gibbs) In many societies private education is a luxury that only the wealthiest can afford. So you may be surprised to learn that in Haiti, the poorest country in the Western hemisphere, far more children attend private schools than state schools. This despite the fact that nation's constitution stipulates all Haitian children have the right to a free education. Unfortunately, no government in Haitian history has come close to achieving that.

Mexican Raperas & Latina Scientist

Mexico - Raperas (Gerry Hadden) Murders of women have become so commonplace in Mexico in recent years, the term "femicide" is now firmly embedded in the country's vocabulary. And in most cases families claim authorities don't properly investigate. But women fighting for justice, security and equal rights in Mexico have a new and vocal ally in their cause: female rappers. The budding movement isn't drawing huge crowds but its message is resonating, especially among the younger generation. Correspondent Gerry Hadden reports on the Raperas of Mexico City.

Guatemala - Trademark Battle/Cuba - Farming Future

Guatemala - Trademark Battle Guatemala is recognized throughout the world for the quality of its intricately handwoven textiles. Mayan women have used them to make blouses known as huipiles that, over hundreds of years, have come to represent an important part of their cultural identity. The weaves have also become popular among contemporary designers who use them to create fashion accessories. But some Mayan women aren't happy about that. Saying their designs are being stolen, they have started a legal battle to trademark their products.

Colombia - Farc's Return to Civil Life/Panama - Drones Protect Territory

Colombia - FARC's return to civil life As fifty years of fighting end in Colombia, FARC rebels are trying to resume a normal life. But while they may be laying down their arms, many are not giving up the fight. Many FARC members claim that while they will surrender their weapons, they won't change their ideology. And transitioning back into society could take years. Panama - Drones protect territory A tribe in Panama with strong roots in the rainforest is seeking a land title to secure their territory. And they're protecting their borders with a surprising form of surveillance. Drones.

Centenarians and Recycling

Costa Rica - Centenarians (Harris Whitbeck) - The number of people who live to be 100 years or more is growing. It's estimated that there are more than 450,000 centenarians living across the globe and that segment of the population is the fastest growing one of all. Experts say there are many factors that contribute to the existence of centenarians and recently they have started identifying key traits that are common to them all. Those traits have also been found in five distinct areas around the globe, and two of them are in the Americas.