Centenarians

Mexican Female Rappers & Argentinean Gabriela Gonzalez

Mexico - Rappers

Women fighting for justice, security and equal rights in Mexico have a new and vocal ally in their cause: female rappers. The budding movement isn't drawing huge crowds yet but its message is resonating. Especially among the young. That's in part because thousands of young women go missing every year in Mexico. And in most cases authorities don't investigate. Our correspondent Gerry Hadden reports from Mexico City. Watch the segment above.

Women in Science - Argentinean Gabriela Gonzalez

When she was growing up in Cordoba, Argentina, Gabriela Gonzalez wanted to be a math teacher. By the time she got to college, she had fallen in love with physics. Now, this professor at Louisiana State University is the spokesperson for a team that has made history for the discovery of gravitational waves, which Einstein predicted 100 years ago. There is little question the team will win the Noble Prize.

Game Changer - Peru - Maria Costa Checa

When it comes to women in science and technology, the challenge is to provide opportunities and access. Even more so in Latin America where women are under-represented in this field. In Peru social entrepreneur Mariana Costa is trying to do just that. She's the founder of the founder of Laboratoria, a social enterprise that empowers young women by giving them access to education and work in the digital sector.

Spain - Domincan Culinary Star

A 27-year-old woman from the Dominican Republic moved to Madrid looking for a career as a chef. But because she had no formal training, the only job she could get was washing dishes. Now, less than ten years later, she is an award-winning chef... and her career is doing all the sparkling. This is the story of Maria Marte, the "Michelin Cinderella" whose hard work is the true protagonist of this fairy tale.

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Americas Now

Immigrant Caravan - Migration remains one of President Donald Trump's political pressure points, as he promises to crack down on illegal immigration like never before. But with buzzwords like 'catch-and-release' flying around, it's difficult to sort facts from political fiction. Correspondent Alasdair Baverstock looks deeper into the issue. Students Crossing - The best way to assess the impact of U.S. immigration policy on children of deported parents is to spend the day with them. That's according to child welfare authorities.

Americas Now

Lifeline for Haiti - In recent years -- money sent by Latinos abroad.. .to their families back home -- has grown. In fact...from 20-16 to 20-17...they sent a total of 75-billion dollars...a new record, according to the World Bank. The money...called, remittances reflect the rise of migration across the continent..."two-thirds" of migrants from Latin America -- live in the United States. One of the countries that receives the most -- is Haiti, where the money accounts for almost 35-percent of the GDP.

Americas Now

Mexico - Tech-Mex - Part of U.S. President Donald Trumps' "get-tough" policy is expected to include an increase in the expulsion of undocumented citizens to their home countries. Mexico is one of the nations that might face the largest number of returnees. For many of them it could feel like starting over as they know little about the language and culture of their country of origin. That makes things like finding a job difficult. But the digital startup sector in Mexico is viewing the return of migrants from the U.S. as an opportunity.

Americas Now

Guatemala - Girls at Risk (Harris Whitbeck) - It was an event that shocked the entire country and made headlines around the world. 42 girls, locked up in a state home for children in Guatemala --burned to death. The fire broke out following protests and accusations of poor conditions and abuse. The incident also revealed many of the vulnerabilities faced by young people. More than a year after the tragedy the victim's relatives are still looking for answers. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck tells us more about Guatemala's girls at risk.

Americas Now

Guatemala - Unearthing Answers - Guatemala is one of the Central American countries that suffered the most during the Cold War - a time of post-World War Two tensions between the Soviet Union and the United States. In particular a civil conflict in Guatemala from 1960 to 1996 that left hundreds of thousands dead -- and tens of thousands missing. More than two decades after the end of the conflict, forensic anthropologists are helping families who have been searching for their disappeared loved ones. Harris Whitbeck explains from Guatemala City.