Ericka Huggins

Ericka Huggins: The Role of Spiritual Practice In Social Justice Work

Ericka Huggins, the renowned former Black Panther, political prisoner, human rights activist — and educator, poet, and professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Merritt College in Oakland — has, for 35 years, advocated for "restorative justice" and the role of spiritual practice in sustaining activism and promoting social change. Grounded in her belief in the greatness of the human heart, Ericka says each one of us has the ability to look there for the answers to questions about the future of our world. Personal transformation is necessary to achieve social transformation.

 

Image: Ericka Huggins | Maarten de Boer/Getty Images Portraits

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Upcoming Airdates

Terry Tempest Williams - A Love That Is Wild

What might a different kind of power look and feel like, and can power be redistributed equitably, even beyond our own species? Conservationist, activist, and one of the nation’s most beloved and acclaimed authors, Terry Tempest Williams has been called “a citizen writer” who speaks eloquently for an ethical stance toward life, showing how environmental issues are social issues that become matters of justice. A scholar at the University of Utah and Dartmouth, she has been equally at home camping in the wilderness and being arrested for civil disobedience.

Manuel Pastor - How Do We Build Movements Based On Vision and Values?

Facing rapidly changing demographics, growing inequality and increased political polarization in the U.S., movement builders are grappling with creating new cross-generational ties and a new understanding of the relationship between equity and economic growth. How do we build movements based on vision and values, not interests and transactions? Manuel Pastor is Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity at USC, and founding Director of the Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community at UC Santa Cruz.

John A. Powell - Beloved Community

As humanity faces global environmental and social collapse, our fear of the “Other” can be magnified by unstable contracting economies, radically shifting demographics, and new social norms. Can humanity overcome these divisions and come together to protect our common home? John A. Powell, a nationally respected voice on race and ethnicity, leads UC Berkeley’s Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, holds the Robert D. Haas Chancellor’s Chair in Equity and Inclusion, serves on the UC Berkeley School of Law faculty, and is author of Racing to Justice.

Rinku Sen: Environmentalism and Racial Justice

Rinku Sen is one of the most dynamic and influential social, racial and gender justice activists of our time, among the nation’s most effective voices for inclusion and human rights. The executive director of Race Forward, she’s also a cutting-edge journalist, author and researcher. Sen shares her vision of how we must urgently learn to face and address our completely intertwined ecological and social justice crises, while we learn how to do it without losing our minds, our friends…or our fights. Introduction by Nina Simons, co-founder and president of Bioneers.

Paul Hawken: Solutions for Climate Change

One of the most important thought leaders, activists and entrepreneurs of our era (as founder of Erewhon Trading Company and Smith & Hawken garden stores), Paul Hawken illuminates his groundbreaking new Project Drawdown. It’s the first systematic attempt to do the math on the most effective climate solutions and technologies that already exist, and the impact they would have if they scaled in a rigorous manner over the next 30 years.