Title

The Art of Making Music Tangible

Director Igor Krasik combines music, urban dance, and motion graphics to create a stunning abstract composition as he explores the idea of composing “Visual Music.” In this film, the director, originally from Minsk, Belarus, continues his exploration of making music tangible, by presenting tri-dimensional figures that pop up into the screen to play with the dancer with sophisticated motion and morphing effects. The performance plays with the different layers of the space and lead viewers into a cinematic journey that remembers a piece of kinetic art that incorporates movement and abstract sculptures.

“A musical piece can remind us of a beautiful moment -- a sound becomes meaningful. Something invisible becomes visible. Basically I am a musician in the visual world,” says Krasik.

Krasik - hands and face
Still from "Music is the Key"

As a young boy, Igor Krasik began experienced music in a classical form with violin lessons. In his late teens, he would go into the dance world. Krasik acknowledges that there was not much of a hip-hop influence in Belarus but Krasik’s relationship to hip-hop would soon change. Krasik would later move to Germany where hip-hop music was more accessible through the media which would also change his relationship to the art of dance forever. 

The piece has a minimalist aesthetic and it creates a synthesis of image and sound as well as a close relationship with the dance choreography. But how does the director articulate this work and achieve such great effects? We talked with the director who lives in Germany to find out what inspires him to create a language that combines visual effects, music, and dance.  

Krasik Hand Motion


Is movement a kind of music?

Theoretically, yes! It’s time-based. When you move, it’s all about time. Musical sound plays somewhere. Time goes by.

Personally though, in dance, music is movement, but movement is not music. Only when the invisible art, music, sounds does it becomes visible through dance. It doesn’t work conversely for me! Of course movements have many properties like music when we think about rhythm, color, mood or performance technique.

When we talk, a noise becomes a word, and then we have a meaning of that word. We use our imagination in that process... It’s the same with music. A musical piece can remind us of a beautiful moment -- a sound becomes meaningful.

How do you think your musical background (as a violinist) compares to your visual background (as a motion designer)?

Good question. I think music is literature because it’s a language. When we talk, a noise becomes a word, and then we have a meaning of that word. We use our imagination in that process. Something acoustic becomes visual. It’s the same with music. A musical piece can remind us of a beautiful moment -- a sound becomes meaningful. Something invisible becomes visible. Basically I am a musician in the visual world.

 

Could you describe the influence of your move from Belarus to Germany? Were there any notable cultural differences?

I was born in UDSSR. The communist leadership was, of course, reflected in the society and influenced the culture as well as a democratic leadership did. Growing up in two different political systems taught and influenced me a lot.

Krasik - upside
Still from "Music is the Key"

 

The jump from Belarus to Germany was a move. Notable cultural differences?

Yes, there are many notable values which are different. At the same time, Russia was influenced by European countries like Germany or France. You even experienced that through the language. Many German words appear in Russian. More or less, I think the distance is not that far.

 

How did you first get involved with the b-boy scene? To those unfamiliar with this scene, how would you describe it?

It was the media. The first video tape I bought in 1999 was more or less the first contact with the scene. The b-boy scene is an avant-garde dance artistic movement which is rooted in hip-hop culture. 

Krasik - somersault
Still from "Music is the Key"

 

What is the “hip-hop spirit?”

Hip-hop spirit? I would say the freedom of expression, the unheard voice behind an iron curtain.

 

How would you compare animation and dance?

These two artistic forms are very close to each other. They are both time and sequence-based, do work in full composition with music and complement each other. You can animate a dancing person, as well as use animation techniques in the dance. Many dancers were inspired by cartoons and reflected that in their dance. The pioneers of popping and locking dance styles were especially inspired by animated cartoons.

We are dedicated to providing you with articles like this one. Show your support with a tax-deductible contribution to Link TV. After all, public media is meant for the public. It belongs to all of us.

Keep Reading