"Earth Focus" is an environmental news magazine that features investigative reports and in-depth stories about our changing environment and how it affects people around the world.

"Earth Focus" presented the inaugural Earth Focus Environmental Film Festival, Los Angeles' first festival of its kind, free to the public on July 29 at Hollywood's iconic Egyptian Theatre, presented by KCET and Link TV in partnership with Washington, D.C.'s renowned "Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital."  A full day of screenings and panels Included "Water & Power: A California Heist," "Rise: Sacred Water- Standing Rock," "Tomorrow" and "The Age of Consequences" with films Introduced by celebrity activists Raphael Sbarge, Ed Begley Jr., Patrick Fabian and Sharon Lawrence. 

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America’s Dirty Secret: Coal Ash

In Juliette, Georgia radioactive water flows from the tap. In Pennsylvania, three adjoining counties battle a rare form of cancer. One thing these communities have in common is their exposure coal ash. Coal combustion powers 40 percent of America’s electricity but generates 130 million tons of coal ash each year. Though it is known to contain carcinogens, coal ash is often dumped in unlined ponds where it leaches into groundwater. There is no federal coal ash regulation on the books—only a patchwork of state level standards.

Chesapeake: Can Oysters Save the Bay?

After centuries of over-harvesting and bouts of disease, oyster populations in the Chesapeake Bay plummeted along with profits for the oyster industry and the health of the Bay. In some areas, native oysters are becoming more abundant. But culture and ecology clash as watermen, who depend on harvesting oysters for income, are at odds with scientists and conservationists who want to restore oyster populations. Filmmaker Sandy Cannon-Brown looks at oysters and the people behind them in her documentary "Spat! Bringing Oysters Back to the Bay."

Mining Battles: Uranium, Coal and Gold

An impoverished former mining community in Colorado hopes that a proposed uranium mill will bring jobs and prosperity until environmentalists step in to try to stop it. Who gets to decide? Filmmaker Suzan Beraza documents the debate in her new film Uranium Drive In.

Neonicotinoids: The New DDT?

Neonicotinoids are the most widely used insecticides in the world. But they've been linked to the decline of honeybees, which pollinate many food crops. And scientists now say neonicotinoids also harm many terrestrial, aquatic, and marine invertebrates. These pervasive insecticides damage sea urchin DNA, suppress the immune systems of crabs, and affect the tunneling and reproductive behavior of earthworms. They kill off insects that many birds, amphibians, and reptiles rely on for food.

Vanishing Coral

“Vanishing Coral” presents the personal story of scientists and naturalists who are working with local communities to protect coral reefs that are being destroyed by warming seas, pollution, and destructive fishing practices. Featured in the documentary is the President of the Biosphere 2 Foundation Abigail Alling, marine biologist and coral expert Phil Dustan, captain of the Mir research sailing vessel Mark Van Thillo, and Nono Suparno, a leading conservationist in Bali.

As part of our mission as public media for Southern California, we want to inspire our audiences to take action to make our community--and our planet-- a better, more environmentally sustainable place to live. We are proud to partner with Mayor Garcetti's office on his Adopt A Plan initiative to provide this opportunity in conjunction with our inaugural Earth Focus Environmental Film Festival.

The pLAn sets forth a path to transform Los Angeles by creating a cleaner environment and stronger economy, while ensuring equity for all Angelenos, and outlines actions within various categories ranging from local water and carbon and climate leadership to preparedness and resiliency and environmental justice. To reach the targets in the pLAn, the Mayor is calling upon organizations, universities, neighborhood councils, community groups, businesses, and individual Angelenos to commit to Adopt the pLAn into action. Since the release of the pLAn over 60 organizations, companies and individuals have made commitments to Adopt the pLAn into action.