Sea turtle and fish at a coral reef in the Maldives | Photo: Tchami, some rights reserved

Making Coastal Communities More Resilient to Extreme Weather

Forty percent of the U.S. population lives in coastal communities exposed to flooding, severe hurricanes, and heavy rainfall events. These natural hazards are costly and will be even more so in the future. Hurricane Sandy caused more than $50 million in damages in 2012. In the next 40 years, New Orleans, New York, and Miami alone stand to face some $20 trillion in flood losses.

Joshua Saks, legislative director of the National Wildlife Federation, looks at how America's communities can be protected and made more resilient in an era of extreme weather.

 

 

 

 

 

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Upcoming Airdates

Neonicotinoids: The New DDT?

Neonicotinoids are the most widely used insecticides in the world. But they've been linked to the decline of honeybees, which pollinate many food crops. And scientists now say neonicotinoids also harm many terrestrial, aquatic, and marine invertebrates. These pervasive insecticides damage sea urchin DNA, suppress the immune systems of crabs, and affect the tunneling and reproductive behavior of earthworms. They kill off insects that many birds, amphibians, and reptiles rely on for food.

Shades of Gray: Living with Wolves

(Earth Focus: Episode 51) Gray wolves once ranged across North America. But by the 1930s, they were nearly extinct—trapped, poisoned and hunted by ranchers, farmers, and government agents. With protection under the 1973 Endangered Species Act, the wolf population rebounded. But wolves lost federal protection in 2011. Now, with hunting permitted in many Western states, the future of this once endangered species may again be in question. Can we live with wolves? "Earth Focus" travels to Montana and Wyoming to find out.

Restoring The Earth

(Earth Focus: Episode 53) It is possible to rehabilitate large-scale damaged ecosystems, to improve the lives of people trapped in poverty and to sequester carbon naturally. John Liu presents "Hope in a Changing Climate," which showcases approaches that have worked on the Loess Plateau in China, Ethiopia and Rwanda. Produced in collaboration with the Environmental Education Media Project (EEMP).

Young Voices for the Planet

This episode features author and illustrator Lynne Cherry's film series "Young Voices for the Planet" about young adults making positive environmental change.

 

Image: Courtesy of Young Voices on Climate Change.

Biodiversity and Health

(Earth Focus: Episode 41) What do plants, snakes, molds, marine sponges, and cone snails have in common? They have helped develop medicines that save human lives. Biodiversity -- the variety of life on Earth -- is key to human survival. But plants, animals, and microorganisms are disappearing at unprecedented rates. What impact will this have on human health? Find out in this Earth Focus special report produced in collaboration with the Center for Health and the Global Environment, Harvard Medical School.