Global 3000

Gender Parity Goals

Ending violence and discrimination against women, putting a stop to child marriage and female genital mutilation, ensuring women are given equal opportunities to become leaders and decision makers in political, economic and public life—these are just some of the targets for gender parity within the Sustainable Development Goals.

We’ve come some way to improving the situation for women and yet the World Economic Forum estimates it will take until 2133 for the gender gap to be completely closed. As Women's History Month wraps up, "Global 3000" takes a look at the situation of women around the world.

  • Violence against Women: Far too common in Guatemala

According to official figures, there are 10,000 rapes in Guatemala every year, but the true number is likely far higher. Many of the victims are girls between the ages of 10 and 18. Women were systematically raped during the country's 36 year civil war from 1960 to 1996. And women still suffer from men's attitude toward them.

Macho behavior is completely acceptable and it’s fine to discriminate and abuse women - that's the attitude fathers pass down to their sons. At the age of 16 Maria Elsa fell in love and moved in with her boyfriend. But he changed completely, keeping her locked up, beating her and raping her multiple times a day. He continued abusing her even after she became pregnant. It was only when her father found out that he came and rescued her. Now she lives with her parents. The father of her child doesn't even pay alimony.

  • India: Young Men Help Tackle Violence against Women

In December 2012, six men attacked and viciously raped a 23-year-old female university student in New Delhi in a bus and then threw her from the vehicle. In 2015, six men raped a 70-year-old nun. An estimated almost 2 million women are murdered every year in India.

Violence against women is part of everyday life in India. In response the state is trying to do more to protect women. An organization in the city of Pune is taking a different approach. It’s targeting young men, educating them in workshops about misogynist attitudes and forms of behavior. Leaders of the initiative are trying to win over young men for gender equality. And it's working.

  • Uganda: NewsRap for the Younger Generation

MC Loy may only be 14 years old, but Uganda's youngest female rapper is a already a star on television. MC Loy, whose real name is Zoe Kabuye, raps the news on the broadcaster NTV.

Her musical messages are aimed above all at the Facebook generation and everyone who would rather listen to music than watch the news. Her lyrics deal with the main problems in Uganda, including poor education and corruption. Some day she wants to become Uganda's president, and she's shared that wish with the current office holder in a text message.

  • German Women Facing Conflicting Demands

There’s a lot of pressure on today’s women to have super careers while at the same time being super sexy super moms. But how high is the price for those who attempt it? Maren Hartmann is a professor who's married with three children. She's got a great career and yet she's still harried by all the demands that are placed on modern women's time.

Maren Hartmann is married. Her husband, also a professor, works at the University of Copenhagen and has to spend three days a week away from home. So how does she see today's woman? And how does he? What role does feminism play today? Have "women's issues" been solved? She says not at all. German universities, they say, are not very friendly toward working mothers. And for that reason alone there's lots that needs to be discussed between the sexes in modern society.

  • Women's Radio in Ramallah

If you watch TV, listen to the radio or read newspapers in Palestine, you'll get a male-centric view of the world. Women are usually depicted as passive and weak, as ancillary figures, students or housewives, but rarely as leaders and experts. Maysoun Odeh Gangat wants to change that, and the Schwab Foundation has honored her as a social entrepreneur.

Maysoun Odeh Gangat thinks that if the media can maintain stereotypes, they can also break them down. In 2010 she started the women's radio station Nisaa FM. She uses the broadcaster to discuss taboos, criticize traditional roles for women and depict women as active participants in Arab society. The station reaches ten percent of the Palestinian population, and half of the listeners are men. The aim of the Gangat's work is to bring people together, not drive them apart.

  • Global Living Rooms: Belgrade

We visit Nataša Topalovic from Serbia. She lives together with her husband and three kids in New Belgrade. She uses part of her living room as a craft space, where she paints and creates fondant figures.

Upcoming Airdates

Global 3000

Take a look at the state of democracy worldwide, starting with a trip to meet activist Srda Popovic. His nonviolent protest contributed to a groundswell of opinion that eventually toppled Serbian autocrat Slobodan Milosevic.

  • 2017-10-24T09:00:00-07:00
    Link TV

Afghanistan: Emerald Trade and Terrorism

Natural resources can be a curse. In some countries, they're the root of war. Global 3000 reports from gem mines in Myanmar and Afghanistan, where precious stones spark conflict and fund terrorism.

Global 3000

The post-Olympics comedown has caused many people in Brazil to lose their jobs, and their homes. China, meanwhile, is battling with an unwelcome side-effect of its growing prosperity: growing waistlines.

Global 3000

Global 3000