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Prism

Blow!

When Filmmaker David Thompson traveled to Singapore, he was a little unsure about how he would be received there as he is gay, and according to Singaporean penal code 377A "any male who commits any act of gross indecency from another male person can be punished in imprisonment for two years." David set out to see what gays felt about this rule, and made some surprising discoveries. He encountered gay clubs and bars, such as the aptly named "Club Taboo," where some patrons had no idea an anti-gay penal code was even in place. "It's illegal, but people do illegal things all the time," said one person. Others expressed disdain that they did feel they are treated as second class citizens for being gay.

David met the leader of Pink Dot, a gay rights advocacy group wanting to gain greater acceptance in the community and ban the penal code all together. Pink Dot also organizes marches and rallies to express their opinions, urging participants to wear the color pink. However, some Singaporeans aren't so sure about this. One interviewee said he still felt unsure about participating in a public event and didn't want to draw too much attention to himself, saying that some gays don't want to get involved with abolishing the penal code, as they are "more comfortable with being comfortable."

David also found out is it not only illegal to be gay, but also illegal to chew gum in Singapore. When asked, residents said they felt the law was "stupid" and got gum from Malaysia and chewed gum very frequently. The sentiment seems to be; a law may say one thing, but the public's actions may be another.

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