Resilient Cities

Jakarta: Art Defying Moral Conservatism

Indonesia, where the national motto is “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” or “Unity in Diversity,” is home to both the world’s largest Muslim majority as well as six additional religions. The country has had a difficult history under the 32-­year dictatorship of General Suharto whose repressive and corrupt militarized rule led to the deaths of hundred thousand.

Despite the repression, his government prioritized religious tolerance. His resignation in 1998 ushered in a new era with a more liberal socio-­political environment, opening up spaces for different groups to organize. Conservative groups took advantage of this change and in recent years, a growing Islamist movement and a new wave of conservative populism are  threatening the identity of Jakarta’s religious and ethnic diversity. The impact has been particularly grave on LGBTQ communities, secular groups, women, and other marginalized people.

This episode features: Ari Bayuaji, an Indonesian-­Canadian visual artist whose sculptures address the problem of censorship; Kartika Jahja, a singer whose music contains strong messages for gender equality; Sakdiya Ma'ruf, a Muslim stand-­up comedian whose controversial performances urge people to engage in dialogue about taboos in Indonesia; and Tamara Pertamina, a transgender performance artist whose practice questions notions around religion and sexual identity and orientation. Each is daring to push the boundaries of their own craft, widening the space to tackle controversial subjects in a place where artists are becoming increasingly suppressed.
 

Available until
2019-12-31T00:00:00-08:00
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Manila: Creating In Spite of Fear

Manila, a giant Asian metropolis with traffic-laden roads, towering skyscrapers and sprawling informal settlements, has become a dangerous place. Rodrigo Duterte was elected president of the Philippines in June 2016, vowing to crack down on the drug trade. Since then, extrajudicial killings have led to the deaths of over 3500 people by vigilantes; his approach is reminiscent of the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, who ruled from 1965 to 1986.

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Nairobi: Art Disrupting Corruption

Kenya is well known internationally for its sandy beaches and wide‐open savannahs that attract foreign tourists every year. But behind the picture perfect postcard hides a bleak reality.

Jakarta: Art Defying Moral Conservatism

Indonesia, where the national motto is “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” or “Unity in Diversity,” is home to both the world’s largest Muslim majority as well as six additional religions. The country has had a difficult history under the 32-­year dictatorship of General Suharto whose repressive and corrupt militarized rule led to the deaths of hundred thousand.

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Chicago is a city that ranks as one of the richest and most productive in the United States, yet it has a deeply segregated urban landscape and a high murder rate. In its south and west sides, impoverished housing blocks sit beside affluent homes, universities and city stadiums. The year 2016 was the city’s most violent in over two decades with a record of 762 homicides, an increase of 58 percent since 2015.