Resilient Cities
S3 E2: Nairobi - Art Disrupting Corruption

Nairobi: Art Disrupting Corruption

Kenya is well known internationally for its sandy beaches and wide‐open savannahs that attract foreign tourists every year. But behind the picture perfect postcard hides a bleak reality.

In 2007 politically motivated ethnic violence spread across the country following a contested election, leaving over one thousand people dead. These ethnic tensions still persist today. The country’s current government, led by the son of Kenya’s first president, is said to be one of the most corrupt in its history, with the country reportedly losing a third of its state budget to corruption every year.

In Nairobi, a city characterized by extremes of wealth and poverty, some artists are fed up of the status quo and are using their art to break through the stagnation that characterizes a political class, which has hardly changed since 1963. This episode follows Anjali Nayar, a Canadian filmmaker who has made Kenya her home; Godfrey Mwampembwa, a political satirist whose caricatures, published in the daily newspaper, poke fun at the excesses of the government; Muthoni Ndonga, a musician whose recently released single is a sharp indictment of corruption in the country; and Sylvester Barasa, a contemporary dancer with polio, determined to carve out a place for himself despite the absence of infrastructure and social support.

 

Available until
2019-03-02T00:00:00-08:00

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