A member of Tolowa Dee-ni' Nation casts his net the beach. | Still from Tending Nature

"Tending Nature" shines a light on the environmental knowledge of indigenous peoples across California by exploring how the state's Native peoples have actively shaped and tended the land for millennia. The series examines how traditional practices can inspire a new generation of Californians to find a balance between humans and nature.

Traveling across the state, the series allows viewers to hear first-hand from Native communities engaged in contemporary projects that revive their culture and inform western sciences. In this season, the Tolowa Dee-ni’, Ohlone, the Pit River tribes, and the multi-tribal Potawot Health Village, generously give their time to guide content about subjects ranging from ocean toxicity, food deserts, traditional sweats, tribal hunting and decolonizing cuisine.

Produced in partnership with the Autry Museum of the American West, which began with the award-winning documentary "Tending the Wild."

Upcoming Airdates

Protecting The Coast with the Tolowa Dee-ni'

Today many California coastal ecosystems are under threat from human caused toxification of our oceans caused by industrial and residential development. This episode journeys to the Smith River near the Oregon border to discover how the Tolowa Dee-ni’ are reviving traditional harvesting of shellfish such as mussels, and in the process, working with state agencies to monitor toxicity levels and redefine the human role in managing marine protected areas.

Decolonizing Cuisine with Mak–‘amham

The entire American populace is “food-washed”, we are eating mass produced products that are often pumped full of harmful chemicals or are genetically modified. Even “organic” certification is being revised and caught in fraud to include non-organic processes. This episode explores how two Ohlone chefs Louis Trevino and Vincent Medina are revitalizing Ohlone language, food practices and adapting them for a modernist palate.