What in the World: Israel

South Sudan: The Rise and Fall of a New Nation

The jubilation that marked the birth of the South Sudanese nation brought no respite to its people. 2 million died and 4 million were displaced in the civil war with Sudan in the lead-up to the 2005 peace agreement. Formal independence came on July 9th, 2011 following a referendum in which more than 98 percent of the population voted for independence. Then things fell apart.

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Venezuela

The most urbanised city in the most urbanised country in the most urbanised region of the world. Caracas in Venezuela. “In Venezuela, we have in particular a history of environmental disasters, of dwellings that are dangerously unstable because of the rains. Every year, the effects of the rains are catastrophic for the poorest people. That’s why the right to housing enshrined in our constitution now vindicates the right of citizens, to decent housing independent of their economic circumstances, or their social class”.

Algeria & Western Sahara

An estimated 165,000 Sahrawis live in refugee camps — El Aaiun, Awserd, Smara, and Dakhla — in the desolate Sahara desert in southwest Algeria. According to UNICEF about 80 percent of them are women and children. The refugees remain "the longest warehoused refugee groups in the world stuck in a remote part of the Sahara where temperatures can reach up to 50 degrees Celsius." The camps are often referred to as “The Devil’s Garden.”

Cameroon

This episode of "What In the World" investigates the modern phenomenon of soccer slavery in which many young footballers trafficked out of Africa have been left to fend for themselves on the streets of European cities.

Mexico

Due to its geographical location, Juarez is a major staging point in the trafficking of drugs to the US. It is also one of the world's most violent cities as drug cartels fight their turf wars there, murdering both gang members and innocent civilians with equal barbarity.

Congo

At the heart of Africa, the Congo for many people will always be associated with Joseph Conrad’s early twentieth-century novel "Heart of Darkness," a title that has become a by-word for the country. And for Benjamin and David, two former child soldiers, and Funaha held as a sex slave by one of the many militias that continue to terrorize the country, that metaphor remains a daily reality. The film explores how this seemingly never-ending conflict impacts on the people of North Kivu.